What are Reactance and Impedance in Alternating Current Circuit?

Reactance is defined an electrical quantity due to which alternating current is opposed by inductor or capacitor or combination of both of them in a circuit. Impedance is the net opposing factor to alternating current. Reactance may also be called impedance offered either by inductor or capacitor. Reactance is denoted by X and impedance by … Read more What are Reactance and Impedance in Alternating Current Circuit?

Difference between Resistance and Impedance

The main difference between Resistance and Impedance is that resistance opposes the flow of DC & AC current whereas Impedance only opposes the flow of AC current. Impedance is having meaning only in AC circuit. It does not have any meaning in DC circuit. Another major difference between resistance and impedance is that impedance may … Read more Difference between Resistance and Impedance

Voltage Division Rule – Explanation, Formula & Derivation

What is Voltage Division Rule? Voltage Division Rule states that the total voltage applied across a series connection of multiple resistors is divided among the resistors in proportional to their resistance.  This means, the voltage drop will be maximum across the resistor having maximum value of resistance. Likewise, it will be minimum for resistor having … Read more Voltage Division Rule – Explanation, Formula & Derivation

Current Division Rule – Explanation, Formula & Derivation

What is Current Division Rule? Current Division Rule states that the total current divided into either of the parallel combination of two resistance or impedance is inversely proportional to the value of resistance / impedance. It basically tells us how the current is divided in the parallel connected resistance. This rule is applicable for AC … Read more Current Division Rule – Explanation, Formula & Derivation

Norton’s Theorem Explained with Example

Norton’s Theorem states that any linear bilateral circuit consisting of independent and or dependent sources viz. voltage and or current sources can be replaced by an equivalent circuit consisting of a current source in parallel with a resistance. The current source is the short circuit current across the load terminals and the resistance is the … Read more Norton’s Theorem Explained with Example

Substitution Theorem Explained with Diagram

Statement of Substitution Theorem: Substitution Theorem states that any branch of a DC bilateral circuit can be substituted by a combination of various circuit elements, provided the current & voltage across the branch remains unchanged. Basically, this theorem tells us the boundary condition to replace a circuit branch. If the value of current and voltage … Read more Substitution Theorem Explained with Diagram